Y Is for Yesterday

Y Is for Yesterday

Book - 2017
Average Rating:
23
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"Of #1 New York Times-bestselling author Sue Grafton, NPR's Maureen Corrigan said, "Makes me wish there were more than 26 letters." With only one letter left, Grafton's many devoted readers will share that sentiment. The darkest and most disturbing case report from the files of Kinsey Millhone, Y is for Yesterday begins in 1979, when four teenage boys from an elite private school sexually assault a fourteen-year-old classmate--and film the attack. Not long after, the tape goes missing and the suspected thief, a fellow classmate, is murdered. In the investigation that follows, one boy turns state's evidence and two of his peers are convicted. But the ringleader escapes without a trace. Now, it's 1989 and one of the perpetrators, Fritz McCabe, has been released from prison. Moody, unrepentant, and angry, he is a virtual prisoner of his ever-watchful parents--until a copy of the missing tape arrives with a ransom demand. That's when the McCabes call Kinsey Millhone for help. As she is drawn into their family drama, she keeps a watchful eye on Fritz. But he's not the only one being haunted by the past. A vicious sociopath with a grudge against Millhone may be leaving traces of himself for her to find"-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York :, G. P. Putnam's Sons,, [2017]
ISBN: 9780399163852
0399163859
Characteristics: 483 pages ; 24 cm

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s
sandraperkins
Oct 14, 2017

I have enjoyed this series, but this book dragged. It is almost 500 pages, and it felt like a real slog. The characters were really unlikeable; I not only did not care what happened to them, I felt that whatever bad happened to them, they deserved.

This book is set in 1989 with flashbacks to 1979. I did not appreciate the plot, even though its premise could have been valid in the time period.

I finished the book because I have read the whole series and there is only one more book after this one. Previously I thought the later books in this series were actually getting better, but I really did not care for this one.

m
mavisja
Oct 13, 2017

This was unlike any Sue Grafton book I've read. I barely made it past the half-way mark and quit reading. The plot was uninteresting and poorly told.

m
MrAmann
Oct 13, 2017

Y is for Yesterday gave the impression that it was not written solely by Grafton but by a committee.

j
Jersey_Girl
Oct 12, 2017

Well two things. I meant to rate this book FIVE stars, but for some reason my rating came up as 4 1/2 stars. Oh well.

Next, reading all the prior ratings, it seems people either loved or hated this book. Not much in between. I loved this book and gave it a 5 star rating. (well I tried to)

All I can say is, for me, her last two books were not great. In fact the "W" book, I thought was awful. The "X" book was OK. She got a little "cutsey" with the X names and references. But it was OK.

This book, I could hardly put down! Half way or less through, I found myself thinking "Sue Grafton is back!" That's all I'm going to say for now. I really, really loved this book.

I hope she does as great a job with her last book in the series, the "Z" book. I can't hardly wait to find out what the title is going to be. Z is for Zebra? Someone breaks into the Zoo and kills a security guard (who has a mysterious past) and kidnaps a zebra?

k
kylie11
Oct 10, 2017

Not Sue Grafton! Are we certain she is not using a "ghost writer"? AWAD

b
bill556
Oct 08, 2017

Wow. I don't remember staggering through 3/4 of a book only to quit, but it happened here.
About one hundred pages remaining, when she went back again to 1979, for the hundredth time, I just quit.
Just a few flashes of the old Grafton were not enough.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

Two crime stories, one was an investigation case involving "Youth, sex, money, betrayal” and the other a weak closure of a serial killer who emerged as a side tale in her 2015 novel X which brought a sigh of relief at the end. More so than previous stories, Grafton's penned too much non-essential information, this time on home decorations, on top of recycling tidbits on herself and the same old ensemble of characters from prior stories. Like I said before: Thank goodness that I was not listening to audiobook and able to speed read those mundane sections. Like cknightkc, a mandatory read after enjoyed or suffered through 25 alphabets already.

n
noshir
Oct 01, 2017

This is the worst Sue Grafton book that I have read and I have read all of her books. Should have been named shades of tabloid.If I want to read four letter words in every sentence , I would not read a mystery book.I could pick up a tabloid magazine.The plot is like a boat without a rudder.I read half of the 500 pages and am not able to read any more,and will give it back to the library.

c
cknightkc
Sep 29, 2017

"Y is for Yawn" in this overly long installment of the popular alphabet mysteries. Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoyed spending time once again with PI Kinsey Milhone and company, including her friend and landlord Henry and Rosie, the fiery Hungarian restaurant owner. It was also fun revisiting the 1980’s in the fictional seaside town of Santa Teresa which has almost taken on the qualities of another character in this popular series. I just wish there had been more of the spunky Kinsey I’ve come to know in this book. The main mystery is particularly graphic, with a host of unlikeable suspects, and for me, an unsatisfying resolution to a holdover villain from a previous book. This being the penultimate novel in the series I was expecting more and ended up being disappointed. Still, as a die-hard fan for the past 30+ years, I will stay true to author Sue Grafton until the bitter end when Z IS FOR ZERO is published in 2019.

c
carol507
Sep 28, 2017

Just ok

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Quotes

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j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

I spent the next couple of hours reading a mystery novel by Elmore Leonard, marveling as I always did at his ear for low-life dialogue.
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Her choice that morning had been an ankle-length claret-colored velvet dress with a ruffled collar, long sleeves, black tights, and high-top red tennis shoes. Her hair was long and thick, a color that fell somewhere between auburn and flame red thanks to a mixture of boxed dyes. Two big silver barrettes held the mass away from her face. On each wrist she wore a wide leather cuff, studded with brass and silver nail heads.
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“You look like you’re on your way to the Renaissance Faire.”
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California was a bust. She expected surfers, dopers, and free spirits, but it was all the same old shit as far as she could tell.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

The little terrier in my nature was busy chasing after the problem, throwing dirt up behind me as I dug my little hole. There was a rat down there somewhere and I would have it for my very own.
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“Sure thing,” I murmured in lieu of breaking my teeth out with a rock.
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Odd how fate is so often embedded in the aftermath of a simple conversation.
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The trick was to look abject and give a lengthy explanation for the infraction, which might or might not be true. The point was to fill the air with verbiage, to apologize at least twice, sounding as sincere as possible for someone who didn’t give a rat’s ass. The secret was to put up no resistance whatever, a technique that had worked well for her in the past.
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... it was incumbent on her to champion reproductive rights, women’s control over their own bodies, and the advisability of women keeping their options open instead of burdening themselves with unwanted offspring.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

She went into her small kitchen to the breakfast nook, and I followed like Mary’s little lamb.
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She was so thin the knobs of her elbows stuck out like the wooden couplers in a set of Tinker Toys.
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He treated you like dirt. Insulted, berated. I don’t think I ever heard him say a nice word to you. And there you were, falling all over yourself promising to love, honor, and obey.
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“You have no filter. Whatever crosses your mind, comes straight out of your mouth.”
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... going to learn anything was to take risks, make mistakes, and suffer the consequences. She thought their job was to keep watch over the process and step in if he was headed down the wrong road.
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“Parents stink, you know that? My dad’s a magician. He gives with one hand and takes away with the other. Poof! Now you see it, now you don’t. Next thing you know, you’re screwed.”

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

Her smile became more winsome, as though she were being witty instead of rude. Just my luck. Bitchy and brittle as a dry stick.
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“She’s never been fond of me,” I said.
“What do you expect? You boffed her husband, from what I hear.”
“She was off on a fling, so what was the poor man supposed to do?”
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The odd but unremarkable truth about women is we’ve had the aggression bred right out of us. Many of us are constitutionally unable to handle any kind of confrontation without bursting into tears.
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There was a time when female amplitude was associated with prosperity. Then there was a period when being thin meant you were disciplined, drove yourself hard, and were careful about what you ate. Now being thin is proof you have enough money to pay for personal trainers, nutritionists, and tummy tucks within a week of giving birth.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

That’s because good news is usually too boring to repeat. The cold hard truth will fall on stony ground, whereas your all-around trashy rumor will flourish like a weed.
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Subterranean frictions set my teeth on edge. This was a pair who fought in front of others without raising their voices or modifying their smiles: verbal abuse framed as jest, with words flying back and forth as softly as cotton balls.
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“A Kentucky driver’s license, which looked all right, but might have been counterfeit. I’ve never seen a real one, so there was no way I could challenge him even if it had occurred to me.”
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‘Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house.’ These days we’re admonished to be modest about our accomplishments, which spoils all the fun.”

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

For the first time, I felt sorry for him. Not that he needed my pity or my dismay, but I knew now how small his life had become.
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I stepped over the dog again, pausing to watch him whimper and twitch in the throes of some doggie dream.
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She said it sounded like depression and I should pick up a bottle of Saint-John’s-wort. Now I find out if you’re taking it, you’re supposed to use backup birth control . . . you know, like a condom or something, just to be safe.”
“It didn’t occur to you a supplement might have negative side effects?”
"Kinsey, it’s organic. It’s not like a drug company manufactures it. The plant grows in meadows and on roadsides. It’s completely natural.”
“So are death cap mushrooms and oleander leaves.”

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

“You’re assuming money’s the motive.”
“What else could it be?”
“Making you suffer. Ruining your lives. Something along those lines.”
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An awareness of the perils unique to womanhood: rape and physical assault at the hands of strangers and acquaintances alike. The majority of rapes are perpetrated by men we know, a sad cause for reflection when embarking on the dating scene.
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The Heckler & Koch VP9 is manufactured from a stamped steel main frame with a polymer trigger guard. The high-profile fixed sights are fitted with two red rectangles on the rear sight and a white stripe on the drift-adjustable front blade sight. There is a lever on the left side of the pistol grip to both decock a cocked hammer or manually re-cock it for a single-action first shot. A manual firing-pin safety is located at the left rear of the slide. Putting it in the down position locks the firing pin, and flipping it up to the level position unlocks it.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

A mother with too many small kids:
“Oh yeah. Most of the time they drive me nuts. You can imagine having the lot of them age five and under. I’m lucky I get a shower in every third day. This is them being good, which I’m happy to report occurs sometimes as often as once a week. Wait until one of them comes down with a cold. Then they’re all sick as dogs, including me and sometimes Mavis. Right, Mav?”
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Get here in the next hour and she can witness feeding time. It’s better than the zoo.
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“She equates motherhood with the end of life as we know it. She actually talks about loading her coat pockets with rocks and walking into the river. Not that we have one around here . . .”
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Anna had neither talent nor ambition, but she had dreams of a better life, and to her way of thinking, children were nothing more than an impediment.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

The aggravating thing about exercise is that it prepares you solely for the one you’re engaged in. Biking, hiking, running, or lifting weights—the activity conditions you for that activity, but not necessarily for anything else.
===
“Documents get lost. Eivdence disappears. Some detective ends up with the package on her desk and sticks it in her bottom drawer because she doesn’t know what else to do with it. I can’t take that chance.”
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He reminded me of Pinocchio. As clever as he thought he was, he was gullible, likely to fall into bad company.
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Coneys versus corn dogs, beef versus pork, New York–style versus Chicago, half-smokes versus bratwurst, and organic versus nothing, as we were both morally opposed to the notion of organic foods of any kind.

j
jimg2000
Oct 07, 2017

I was looking at the end of a marriage, the final flicker as that last wee ember winked and went out.
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You think I’m a dope? Now I’m a dope with a gun...
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You said shut your ‘big mother’ instead of shut your big mouth. Talk about a Freudian slip. That’s hysterical.
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He reminded me of Pinocchio. As clever as he thought he was, he was gullible, likely to fall into bad company.
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He’d learned to toss painful issues into little boxes with the lids nailed shut; this when he was five years old and his parents got divorced. Even at that age, he recognized the jeopardy he was in. He was the focus of the hostilities—not his person, but the fact that he was Tigg and Joan Montgomery’s only begotten son. They quarreled, through their attorneys, over legal custody, physical custody, visitation, child support, schooling, and every other decision that was made from the moment they separated.

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